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Get Rid of Those Receivables! - Our Receivable Loan Company Can Give
Your Truck Company The Cash Your Company Needs

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Factoring invoices is advantageous for numerous factors. It permits a trucking company to raise money without obtaining new debt. While financial obligation is in some cases required, the majority of freight broker firm would prefer to raise cash without borrowing money. Debt is high-risk, and when it can not be paid back, assets can be repossessed. If the debt is large enough, it could even force a trucking firms out of business.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Free Book Tells You 12 Secrets of Better Cash Flow - Pick A Freight�Factoring Company  Instead Of A Regular Bank Funding

How to Enhance Cash Flow Without Borrowing -Cash Money flow is among the main reasons companies fail.

At one time or another, every business, even successful ones, have experienced poor cash flow.

Cash flow does not have to be a problem any more. Do not be fooled -- banks are not the only locations you can get financing. Other solutions are available and you do not have to borrow money. What is truck factoring ? One option is called trucking factoring. Truck Factoring is the process of selling invoices to an investor instead of waiting to collect the cash from the customer. Oh, the Irony- Trucking factoring has an ironic difference: It is the financial foundation of numerous of America's most successful businesses. Why is this paradoxical ? Because factoring is not instructed in business colleges, is seldom mentioned in company strategies and is fairly unknown to the majority of most of American business individuals.

Yet it is a monetary procedure that frees billions of dollars every year, allowing countless businesses to grow and succeed. Invoice Factoring has actually been around for thousands of years. Receivable Financing Companies are investors who pay cash for the right to receive the future payments on your invoices. An overdue receivable or invoice has value. It is a financial obligation your customer has agreed pay in the near future. Factoring Principals--Although factoring deals solely with business-to-business deals, a big percentage of the retail company utilizes a factoring principal. MasterCard, Visa, and American Express all use a type of factoring in their retail deals. Using the purest meaning of the word, these big consumer finance companies are really just big Accounts Receivable Factoring Businesses of consumer paper. Consider it: You purchase at Sears and charge it to your MasterCard. The store makes money almost immediately, although you do not make payment until you are ready.

For this service, the credit card company charges XYZ Store a charge (typical common normal fees range from 2 to 4 percent of the sale). The Benefits Receivable Loan Funding can offer many advantages to cash-hungry companies. Rather than wait 30, 60, 90 days or longer for payment on an item that has actually currently been delivered, a company can factor (sell) its receivables for money at a little discount off the amount of the invoice. Payroll, advertising efforts, and working capital are simply a few of the company requirements that can be satisfied with instant  money.

Staffing Factoring provides the means for a producer to renew inventory and make more products to offer: There is no longer a requirement to await for earlier sales to be paid. Receivable Loan Financing is not just a money management device for manufacturers: Almost any kind business can benefit from Accounts Receivable Factoring. Generally, a business that extends credit will have 10 to 20 percent of its yearly sales tied up in accounts receivable at any given time. Think for a minute about exactly how much is tied up in 60 days' worth of invoices: You can not pay the power expense or today s payroll with a customer s invoice, however you can offer that invoice for the cash to meet those obligations. Using trucking factoring companies is a quick and simple process. The factor purchases the invoice at a price cut, usually a couple of percentage points less than the stated value of the invoice.

 

 

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"

Salt Lake City, often shortened to Salt Lake, or SLC is the capital and the most populous city in the state of Utah. With an estimated population of 191,180 in 2013, the city lies in the core of the Salt Lake City metropolitan area, which has a total population of 1,140,483 as of the 2013 estimate. Salt Lake City is further situated in a larger urban area known as the Salt Lake City-Provo-Ogden, UT Combined Statistical Area. This region is a corridor of contiguous urban and suburban development stretched along an approximate 120-mile seent of the Wasatch Front, comprising a total population of 2,389,225 as of 2013. It is one of only two major urban areas in the Great Basin (the other being Reno, Nevada), and the largest in the Intermountain West. In 2014, deemed Salt Lake City to be the least stressed-out city in the United States, citing the low cost of living and abundance of jobs.

The city was founded in 1847 by Brigham Young, Isaac Morley, George Washington Bradley and several other Mormon followers, who extensively irrigated and cultivated the arid valley. Due to its proximity to the Great Salt Lake, the city was originally named "Great Salt Lake City"—the word "great" was dropped from the official name in 1868 by the 17th Utah Territorial Legislature. Although Salt Lake City is still home to the headquarters of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), less than half the population of Salt Lake City proper are members of the LDS Church today.

Immigration of international LDS members, mining booms, and the construction of the first transcontinental railroad initially brought economic growth, and the city was nicknamed the Crossroads of the West. It was traversed by the Lincoln Highway, the first transcontinental highway, in 1913, and presently two major cross-country freeways, I-15 and I-80, intersect in the city. Salt Lake City has since developed a strong outdoor recreation tourist industry based primarily on skiing, and hosted the 2002 Winter s. It is the industrial banking center of the United States.

 

Before Mormon settlement, the Shoshone, Ute, and Paiute had dwelt in the Salt Lake Valley for thousands of years. At the time of the founding of Salt Lake City, the valley was within the territory of the Northwestern Shoshone; however, occupation was seasonal, near streams emptying from Canyons into the Salt Lake Valley. The land was treated by the United States as public domain; no aboriginal title by the Northwestern Shoshone was ever recognized by the United States or extinguished by treaty with the United States. The first US explorer in the Salt Lake area is believed to be Jim Bridger in 1825, although others had been in Utah earlier, some as far north as the nearby Utah Valley (the Dominguez-Escalante expedition of 1776 were undoubtedly cognizant of the Salt Lake valley). U.S. Army officer John C. Frémont surveyed the Great Salt Lake and the Salt Lake Valley in 1843 and 1845. The Donner Party, a group of ill-fated pioneers, had traveled through the Great Salt Lake Valley in August 1846.

The first permanent settlements in the valley date to the arrival of the Latter-day Saints on 24 July 1847. They had traveled beyond the boundaries of the United States into Mexican Territory seeking an isolated area to practice their religion, far away from the violence and the persecution they experienced in the East. Upon arrival at the Salt Lake Valley, president of the church Brigham Young is recorded as stating, "This is the right place, drive on". Brigham Young claimed to have seen the area in a vision prior to the wagon train's arrival. They found the broad valley empty of any human settlement.

Four days after arriving in the Salt Lake Valley, Brigham Young designated the building site for the Salt Lake Temple, which would eventually become a famous Mormon and Salt Lake City landmark.

The Salt Lake Temple, constructed on the block that would later be called Temple Square, took 40 years to complete. Construction started in 1853, and the temple was dedicated on 6 April 1893. The temple has become an icon for the city and serves as its centerpiece. In fact, the southeast corner of Temple Square is the initial point of reference for the Salt Lake Meridian, and for all addresses in the Salt Lake Valley.

The Mormon pioneers organized a new state called Deseret and petitioned for its recognition in 1849. The United States Congress rebuffed the settlers in 1850 and established the Utah Territory, vastly reducing its size, and designated Fillmore as its capital city. Great Salt Lake City replaced Fillmore as the territorial capital in 1858, and the name was subsequently abbreviated to Salt Lake City. The city's population continued to swell with an iux of Mormon converts and Gold Rush gold seekers, making it one of the most populous cities in the American Old West.

Explorer, ethnologist, and author Richard Francis Burton traveled by coach in the summer of 1860 to document life in Great Salt Lake City, to investigate the claims of anti-Mormonists of his day, and to broaden his knowledge of the new faith. He was granted unprecedented access during his three-week visit, including audiences with President Brigham Young and other still-living contemporaries of Joseph Smith. The records of his visit include sketches of the early city buildings, a description of local geography and agriculture, commentary on its politics and social order, essays, speeches, and sermons from Brigham Young, Isaac Morley, George Washington Bradley and other prominent leaders, and snapshots of everyday life such as newspaper clippings and the menu from a high-society ball.

Disputes with the federal government ensued over the Mormon practice of polygamy. A climax occurred in 1857 when President James Buchanan declared the area in rebellion after Brigham Young refused to step down as governor, beginning the Utah War. A division of the United States Army, commanded by Albert Sidney Johnston, later a general in the army of the Confederate States of America, marched through the city and found that it had been evacuated. This division set up Camp Floyd approximately 40 mi (64 km) southwest of the city. Another military installation, Fort Douglas, was established in 1862 to maintain Union allegiance during the American Civil War. Many area leaders were incarcerated at the territorial prison in Sugar House in the 1880s for violation of anti-polygamy laws. The LDS Church began their eventual abandonment of polygamy in 1890, releasing "The Manifesto", which officially suggested that members obey the law of the land (which was equivalent to forbidding new polygamous marriages inside the U.S. and its territories, but not in Mormon settlements in Canada and Mexico). This paved the way for statehood in 1896, when Salt Lake City became the state capital.

The First Transcontinental Railroad was completed in 1869 at Promontory Summit on the north side of the Great Salt Lake. A railroad was connected to the city from the Transcontinental Railroad in 1870, making travel less burdensome. Mass migration of different gro followed. Ethnic Chinese (who laid most of the Central Pacific railway) established a flourishing Chinatown in Salt Lake City nicknamed "Plum Alley", which housed around 1,800 Chinese during the early 20th century. The Chinese businesses and residences were demolished in 1952 although a historical marker has been erected near the parking ramp which has replaced Plum Alley. Immigrants also found economic opportunities in the booming mining industries. Remnants of a once-thriving Japantown – namely a Buddhist temple and Japanese Christian chapel – still remain in downtown Salt Lake City. European ethnic gro and East Coast missionary gro constructed St. Mark's Episcopal Cathedral in 1874, the Roman Catholic Cathedral of the Madeleine in 1909 and the Greek Orthodox Holy Trinity Cathedral in 1923. This time period also saw the creation of Salt Lake City's now defunct red-light district that employed 300 courtesans at its height before being closed down in 1911.[18]

 

During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, an extensive streetcar system was constructed throughout the city with the first streetcar running in 1872 and electrification of the system in 1889. As in the rest of the country, the automobile usurped the streetcar, and the last trolley was approved for conversion in 1941, yet ran until 1945, due to WWII. Trolley buses ran until 1946. Light rail transit returned to the city when UTA's TRAX opened in 1999.[19] The S Line (formerly known as Sugar House Streetcar) opened for service in December 2013 on an old D&RGW right-of-way.[20][21]

The city's population began to stagnate during the 20th century as population growth shifted to suburban areas north and south of the city. Few of these areas were annexed to the city, while nearby towns incorporated and expanded themselves. As a result, the population of the surrounding metropolitan area greatly outnumbers that of Salt Lake City. A major concern of recent government officials has been combating inner-city commercial decay. The city lost population from the 1960s through the 1980s, but experienced some recovery in the 1990s. Presently, the city is losing population again (though that of the metro area continues to grow), having lost an estimated 2 percent of its population since the year 2000.[22]

The city has experienced significant demographic shifts in recent years.[23] Hispanics now account for approximately 22% of residents and the city has a significant homosexual community.[24] There is also a large Pacific Islander population, mainly made up of Samoans and Tongans; they compose roughly 2% of the population of the Salt Lake Valley area.

Salt Lake City was selected to host the 2002 Winter s in 1995. The games were plagued with controversy. A bid scandal surfaced in 1998 alleging that bribes had been offered to secure the city for the 2002 games location. During the games, other scandals erupted over contested judging scores and illegal drug use. Despite the controversies, the games were heralded as a financial success, being one of the few in recent history to profit. In preparation major construction projects were initiated. Local freeways were expanded and repaired, and a light rail system was constructed. venues are now used for local, national, and international sporting events and athlete training.[25] Tourism has increased since the games,[26][not in citation given] but business did not pick up immediately following them.[27] Salt Lake City has expressed interest in bidding for the 2022 Winter s[28][29]

Salt Lake City hosted the 16th Winter Deaflympic games in 2007, taking place in the venues in Salt Lake City and Park City,[30] and Rotary International chose the city as the host site of their 2007 convention, which was the single largest gathering in Salt Lake City since the 2002 Winter s.[31] The U.S. Association convention in 2005 drew 39,500 attendees.

The modern economy of Salt Lake City is service-oriented. In the past, nearby steel, mining and railroad operations provided a strong source of income with Silver King Coalition Mines, Geneva Steel, Bingham Canyon Mine, and oil refineries. Today the city's major industries are government, trade, transportation, utilities, and professional and business services. The city is known as the "Crossroads of the West" for its central geography in the Western United States. The daytime population of Salt Lake City proper swells to over 315,000 people, not including tourists or students.[80]

Local, state, and federal governments have a large presence in the city, and trade, transportation, and utilities also take up a significant portion of employment, with the major employer being the western North America Delta Air Lines hub at Salt Lake City International Airport. Equally significant are the professional and business services, while health services and health educational services are significant areas of employment, including the largest health care provider in the West, Healthcare. Metropolitan Salt Lake was also once the headquarters of Stores, the Companies, and MI, one of the first department stores; it is currently owned by nc. Former MI stores now operate under the label. High-tech firms with a large presence in the suburbs include .

Other economic activities include tourism, conventions, and major suburban call centers. Tourism has increased since the 2002 Winter Games,[26] and many hotels and restaurants were built for the events. The convention industry has expanded since the construction of the Salt Palace convention center in the late 1990s, which hosts trade shows and conventions, including the annual Outdoor Retailers meeting and Novell's annual BrainShare convention.

In 2006, the largest potato producer in Idaho, the United Potato Growers of America, announced that it would relocate its headquarters to Salt Lake City, citing its need for a large international airport, being that Salt Lake City International is the 22nd busiest in the world in combined freight and passengers. The announcement led some members of the Idaho legislature to propose legislation changing the state license plate, which currently reads "Famous Potatoes".[83]

In 2005, it was found that the downtown area was experiencing rapid population growth.[84] The number of residential units in the central business district has increased by 80% since 1995, and is forecast to nearly double in the next decade. The City Creek development of the LDS Church added 300 units in its first phase including the 415 ft (126 m) tall City Creek condominium tower.[85] Associates currently has two projects under construction and two more planned.[86] A residential tower is planned for Trolley Square, and this follows the recent completion of the Northgate Apartments and 12-story condominiums at Gateway with two more buildings finished nearby and the Liberty Metro apartments near Library Square.

Office vacancy rates are low in the downtown region. In response, two new large buildings are being constructed. The first is eight stories and located in the Gateway District,[87] while the second will be 22 stories high and is currently under construction on Main Street.[88] In addition, the historic Walker Bank Building is currently undergoing major renovations that will enable it to achieve Class A office space status.[89] Construction of the Gateway District, City Creek Center, TRAX light rail, and FrontRunner commuter rail service have supported the revival of downtown. In 2013, Salt Lake City ranked No. 12 on Forbes' list of the Best Places for Business and Careers.[90]

 

West Valley City is a city in Salt Lake County and a suburb of Salt Lake City in the U.S. state of Utah. The population was 129,480 at the 2010 census, making it the second-largest city in Utah. The city incorporated in 1980 from a large, quickly growing unincorporated area, which was variously known as Granger, Hunter, Chesterfield, and Redwood. It is home to the Maverik Center and USANA Amphitheater.

The earliest known residents of the western Salt Lake Valley were Native American bands of the Ute and Shoshoni tribes.

The first people to live in the area were the Latter Day Saints(Mormons). The Euro-Americans arrived in the Salt Lake Valley in 1847. The area was first staked out by settler Joseph Harker and his family in the area they named as "over Jordan" (referring to the land west of the Jordan River, which runs through the valley).

The Granger area was settled by Welsh Latter-day Saints who had come to Utah with Dan Jones in 1849. Irrigation systems and agriculture were developed in the area, and it was Elias Smith who proposed the area's name on account of its successful farming. At other times high alkali content made farming difficult, but there were enough Latter-day Saints to form a separate Granger Ward in 1884. Granger and vicinity had about 1,000 people in 1930.[4]

Hunter was not settled until 1876. This settlement was started by Rasmus Nielsen, Edward Rushton, August Larsen and about seven others along with their families. Irrigation began in 1881 and the main crop was fruit trees.[5]

The city began to experience rapid growth in the 1970s, when the area that is now West Valley City consisted of the four separate communities of Hunter, Granger, Chesterfield, and Redwood. These four unincorporated areas merged in 1980 to form the present-day city. During the 2002 Winter Games, West Valley City was the official venue for men's and women's ice hockey.

On May 19, 2011, the city unveiled an official plan to create a downtown area for the city over the course of 10 years, building on plans and development that already existed. It will be known as Fairbourne Station (named after Joseph Fairbourne, an early settler who operated a weigh station in the area in the late 19th century) and will consist of approximately 40 acres, costing $500 million to build. The center will include a civic center (consisting of city hall, a courthouse, police headquarters, and a library), an 8-story Embassy Suites hotel, a plaza, and residential development, as well as the end of the TRAX Green Line, as well as a stop

on the 3500 South MAX bus rapid transit line. Valley Fair Mall and the Maverik Center are located nearby, as is I-215. Much of the development has already occurred, with the TRAX line having opened in 2011 and the hotel in 2012.[6]

Notorious serial killer Ted Bundy was arrested in Granger on August 16, 1975 on a routine traffic stop.

In 2013, the city police's narcotics unit was disbanded due to rampant corruption among its officers. These officers were found stealing small items from seized vehicles, taking evidence, and placing tracking devices on potential suspects' vehicles without warrants.

Companies based in West Valley City include Backcountry.com, CR England, FranklinCovey, and USANA Health Sciences.

is the third-largest city in the U.S. state of Utah, located about 43 miles (69 km) south of Salt Lake City along the Wasatch Front. Provo is the largest city and county seat of Utah County. It lies between the cities of Orem to the north and Springville to the south. With a population at the 2010 census of 112,488,[1] Provo is the principal city in the Provo-Orem metropolitan area, which had a population of 526,810 residents at the 2010 census.[5] It is the third-largest metro area in the state behind Salt Lake City and Ogden-Clearfield.

The city is home to Brigham Young University, a private higher education institution, which is operated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). Provo is also home to the largest Missionary Training Center for the LDS Church. The city is a key operational center for Novell and has been a focus area for technology development in Utah. The city is also home to the Peaks Ice Arena, which served as a venue for the Salt Lake City Winter s in 2002. Sundance Resort is located 13 miles (21 km) northeast at Provo Canyon.

In 2009, Provo was listed in Where to Retire magazine as an "enticing city for new careers." Provo was also listed in National Geographic Adventure magazine's "where to live and play" as a cultural hub.[6] In 2010, Forbes rated Provo one of the top 10 places to raise a family. Additionally, in 2013, Forbes ranked Provo the No. 2 city on its list of Best Places for Business and Careers.

On April 17, 2013, Provo announced that it would be the second metropolitan area in the United States to have Google Fiber, by purchasing an existing city-owned fiberoptic network.

Father Silvestre Velez de Escalante, a Spanish Franciscan missionary-explorer, is considered the first European explorer to have visited the area, in 1776. Escalante chronicled this first European exploration across the Great Basin desert.

Provo was originally called Fort Utah when it was settled in 1849 by 33 Mormon families from Salt Lake City, but was renamed Provo in 1850 for Étienne Provost, an early French-Canadian trapper who arrived in the region in 1825. The Battle of Fort Utah was fought at Provo in 1850.

 

West Jordan is a city in Salt Lake County, Utah, United States. West Jordan is a rapidly growing suburb of Salt Lake City and has a mixed economy. According to the 2010 Census, the city had a popula"

 

"

m is one of the principal cities of the Provo-Orem, Utah Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Utah and Juab counties. The population was 84,324 at the 2000 census, while the 2010 population was 88,328 making it the fifth-largest city in Utah. Utah Valley University is located in Orem. The Orem of the minor league baseball Pioneer League play their home games at the college.

Orem uses the moniker "Family City USA". In fact, in 2010 rated it the 5th best place to raise a family. At one time the area was known as Sharon, a Biblical name for a mostly level strip of land running between mountains and the sea, and the name of the Vermont birth town of Joseph Smith, founder of the Latter Day Saint movement. Another former name was Provo Bench. In an apparent attempt to attract more investment to the town and provide an easy way for the large population of farmers with orchards to ship produce, in 1914 it was named after Walter C. Orem, President of the Salt Lake and Utah railroad in the early 1900s. Orem was incorporated in 1919.

Orem has a wide variety of stores and businesses. One of the oldest businesses still operating in Orem is the locally owned Park's Sportsman, opened in the 1950s. Orem is also home to the oldest mall in Utah County, opened in March 1973.>

 

Sandy (officially known as Sandy City) is a city in Salt Lake County, Utah, United States. It is a suburb of Salt Lake City. The population was 87,461 at the 2010 census, making it the sixth-largest city in Utah.

Sandy is home to the South Towne Center shopping mall, the Jordan Commons entertainment and dining complex, and the Southtowne Exposition Center. It is also the location of the soccer-specific Rio Tinto Stadium, which hosts Real Salt Lake home games, and opened on October 8, 2008.

Located at the base of the Wasatch Mountains thirteen miles (19 km) south of Salt Lake City, Sandy was a likely area for early settlement. The area was first used by nomadic bands of Paiute, Shoshone, and Bannock Indians who roamed along the base of the mountains as they travelled from their winter home at Utah Lake to their summer fishing grounds at Bear Lake.

Permanent settlers first moved into Sandy during the 1860s and 1870s because of the availability of land in the less crowded southern end of the Salt Lake Valley. The original plat was essentially one square mile, situated on an alluvial terrace running north and south along the eastern edge of the Jordan River drainage system and paralleling the mountain range.

The origin of its name has not been established with any certainty. Perhaps most widely believed is that Brigham Young named Sandy for its thirsty soil, but there is no historical evidence for this. Another theory is that the name came from a legendary and colorful Scotsman, Alexander "Sandy" Kinghorn, the engineer who ran the first train line to this end of the Salt Lake Valley. Though this seems bolstered by the original name (Sandy Station or Sandy's Station), historians consider it unlikely in view of the short period between the start of the train service and the first instances of the name.

In 1863, there were only four homes between Union (7200 South) and Dunyon (Point of the Mountain): the Thayne homestead at 6600 South and 800 East, one in Crescent, one at Dunyon, and a fourth outside present-day Sandy boundaries altogether. Within a few years, Thomas Allsop, a Yorkshire farmer who had immigrated to Utah in 1853, owned almost half of present-day Sandy from County Road to Fourth East along Alta Road to Lindell Parkway. LeGrand Young owned the land between Fourth East and State Street.

Farmers willing to try their hand at the thirsty soil that inspired Sandy's name took up land along State Street, which stretched from downtown Salt Lake City to Point of the Mountain. But it was mining that shaped Sandy's first four decades. When silver mining began in Little Cottonwood Canyon, entrepreneurs recognized Sandy's value as a supply station; soon its main street was lined with hotels, saloons, and brothels serving miners ready to spend their newly earned wages. Three major smelters were located in Sandy. They were the Flagstaff, the Mingo, and the Saturn. These made Sandy the territory's most significant smelting center for a number of years.

The railroad was also significant in determining the course of Sandy's history. Built in 1873, the railroad connected Sandy to Salt Lake City and facilitated the transportation of ore and other products both in and out of the area. A streetcar line in 1907 facilitated the transportation of locals to jobs in Salt Lake City; and the automobile later continued to serve that function.

When the mines failed in the 1890s, Sandy faltered, then underwent a significant economic transformation into an agricultural community. The fact that Sandy did not disappear, like so many other mining towns that dwindled with their mother lodes, was due to its location, resources, and the spirit of its inhabitants.

Incorporation

Sandy was incorporated in 1893, largely as part of an effort to combat what Mormon inhabitants considered "unsavory" elements in the town. Due to its mine-based beginnings, Sandy was somewhat of a boomtown, unlike the majority of other rural Utah towns. After incorporation, it was almost as if Sandy had redefined itself. Gone were the large numbers of single, transient men. By 1900, there was only a handful of saloons and hotels, and Sandy began to more closely resemble other rural Utah towns — a place where everyone knew everyone else. Church, farming, business, and family formed the focus of the inhabitants' world.

This pace and way of life continued for more than six decades, interrupted only by wars, the Depression, and the changing seasons. No significant jumps in population, economic trends, or social patterns altered the predictable and stable rhythm of life.

In the late 1960s, however, this rural town dramatically changed course with its second boom. It had always been assumed by local leaders and citizens that Sandy would grow outward from its logical and historic center—the nexus of Main and Center streets. However, population growth overwhelmed the physical center as neighborhoods spread out in every direction over the land.

During the 1970s, pocket communities took shape, providing the services, schools, and shopping traditionally offered by a city. Annexation issues became prominent as Salt Lake County and Sandy vied for control over land and resources. Sandy became a collection of small local communities identified by a youthful, family-oriented population. Although it was initially perceived as a bedroom community, and often still is, it has since developed a thriving commercial center along State Street and other various arterial roads.

 

Utah, United States, approximately 10 miles (16 km) east of the Great Salt Lake and 40 miles (64 km) north of Salt Lake City. The population was 82,825 according to the 2010 Census. The city served as a major railway hub through much of its history, and still handles a great deal of freight rail traffic which makes it a convenient location for manufacturing and commerce. Ogden is also known for its many historic buildings, proximity to the Wasatch Mountains, and as the location of Weber State University.

Ogden is a principal city of the Ogden–Clearfield, Utah Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Weber, Morgan, and Davis counties. The 2010 Census placed the Metro population at 547,184. In 2010, rated the Ogden-Clearfield MSA as the 6th best place to raise a family.[7] Ogden has had a Sister City relationship to Hof (Germany) since 1954.

Originally named Fort Buenaventura, the city of Ogden was the first permanent settlement by people of European descent in the region that is now Utah. It was established by the trapper Miles Goodyear in 1846 about a mile west of where downtown Ogden is currently located. In November 1847, Fort Buenaventura was purchased by the Mormon settlers for $1,950. The settlement was then called Brownsville, after Captain James Brown, but was later named Ogden for a brigade leader of the Hudson's Bay Company, Peter Skene Ogden, who had trapped in the Weber Valley a generation earlier. The site of the original Fort Buenaventura is now a Weber County park.Ogden is the closest sizable city to the Golden Spike location at Promontory Summit, Utah, where the First Transcontinental Railroad was joined in 1869. Ogden was known as a major passenger railroad junction owing to its location along major east-west and north-south routes, prompting the local chamber of commerce to adopt the motto, "You can't get anywhere without coming to Ogden."[8] Railroad passengers traveling west to San Francisco from the eastern United States typically passed through Ogden (and not through the larger Salt Lake City to the south). Ogden, however, is no longer served by Amtrak, the national passenger rail system, and passengers desiring to travel from Ogden by rail must travel via FrontRunner commuter rail to Salt Lake City and Provo.

n 1972, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints completed construction of and dedicated the Ogden Utah Temple in Ogden. The temple was built to serve the large LDS population in the area. In 2010, the LDS Church announced a major renovation of the Ogden Temple and the adjacent Tabernacle. The work, which began in April 2011, includes completely changing the dated 70's exterior, removing the steeple from the Tabernacle so as to make the Temple's steeple a main focus, as well as a new underground parking garage and gardens.[9]

Because Ogden has historically been the second largest city in Utah, it is home to a large number of historic buildings. However, by the 1980s, several Salt Lake City suburbs and Provo had surpassed Ogden in population.

The Defense Depot Ogden Utah operated in Ogden from 1941 to 1997. Some of its 1,128 acres (456 ha) has since been converted into a commercial and industrial park called the Business Depot Ogden.

As the principal city of the 2nd largest MSA in Utah, Ogden serves as an economic hub for the northern part of the state. Much of the central city is occupied by offices of various federal, state, county, and municipal government entities. The Internal has a large regional facility in Ogden and is the city's largest employer with over 5,000 employees.[29] Other large employers include McKay Dee Hospital, Weber State University, Ogden City School District, Autoliv, Fresenius, and Convergys.[30]

In 2013, Ogden ranked No. 16 on ' list of the Best Places for Business and Careers.[31]

Several industrial areas are found in the western parts of the city. The largest of these is Business Depot Ogden, a former Army depot that was restructured to be a 1,000-plus acre business park.[32]

 

St. George is a city located in the southwestern part of the U.S. state of Utah on the Utah-Arizona border, and the county seat of Washington County, Utah.[4] It is the principal city of the St. George Metropolitan Statistical Area. The city is 117 miles (188 km) northeast of Las Vegas, and 303 miles (488 km) south-southwest of Salt Lake City on Interstate 15.

As of 2012 St. George had a population of 75,561. St. George was the second fastest-growing metropolitan area in the United States, only after Greeley, Colorado in 2005, this trend continued through 2007, when growth slowed substantially due to the economic recession. In 2012, the St. George metropolitan area (defined as Washington County) had an estimated 144,809 residents.

The hub of southern Utah and Utah's Dixie, a nickname given to the area when Mormon pioneers grew cotton in the warm climate, St. George is the seventh-largest city in Utah and the largest city in the state outside of the Wasatch Front.[7] According to the U.S. Census Bureau, it had the distinction in the late 2000s of having the fastest white population growth in the nation.[8] It has been observed that the conservative social culture of the region shows, on the one hand, friction between "business-driven conservatives" and "anti-illegal immigration social conservatives," and on the other, some tensions between Mormons (by far a majority of the population) and non-Mormons.[9]

St. George was founded as a cotton mission in 1861 under the direction of Apostle Erastus Snow, called by Brigham Young, the president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church)—part of a greater church effort to become self-sufficient. While the early settlers did manage to grow cotton, it was never produced at competitive market rates; consequently, cotton farming was eventually abandoned.

At the outbreak of the American Civil War in 1861, Brigham Young organized the settlement of what is now Washington County, Utah.

Fearing that the war would take away the cotton supply, he began plans for raising enough in this western country to supply the needs of his people. Enough favorable reports had come to him from this warm country below the rim of the Great Basin, that he was convinced cotton could be raised successfully here. At the general church conference in Salt Lake City on October 6th, 1861, about three hundred families were “called" to the Dixie mission to promote the cotton industry. Most of the people knew nothing of this expedition until their names were read from the pulpit; but in nearly every case, they responded with good will, and made ready to leave within the month’s time allotted to them. The families were selected so as to ensure the communities the right number of farmers, masons, blacksmiths, businessmen, educators, carpenters, as needed.[10]

The settlement was named after George A. Smith, an apostle of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.[11]

 

SkyWest Airlines is headquartered in St. George, and is the primary airline provider at the city's municipal airport.[30] Walmart has a large distribution center just outside the city and Family Dollar recently opened a distribution center in the Fort Pierce Industrial Park to better serve the southwest region of the U.S.

The Washington County School District main offices are based in the city.[31]

A large part of the local economy comes from tourism, due to its proximity to Zion National Park, Bryce Canyon National Park, and Grand Canyon National Park as well as several state parks and recreational areas. Year-round golf and other world-recognized events are also large contributors to the city's economy.

 

Layton is a city in Davis County, Utah, United States. It is part of the Ogden–Clearfield, Utah Metropolitan Statistical Area. The city is named after Christopher Layton, a Mormon colonizer and leader. The population was 67,311 at the 2010 census. 2013 estimates placed the population at 70,790.

Founding

Layton was settled in the 1850s as an outgrowth of Kaysville. It was included in the boundaries when Kaysville was incorporated as a city in 1868, but by the 1880s many Layton residents wanted to separate from the city. They questioned Kaysville's authority to tax their property, claiming they received no municipal services. This dispute reached the United States Supreme Court in 1894 as the case of Linford v. Ellison, which was decided in favor of the Layton property owners. The separatist movement finally succeeded in 1902, when Layton became an independent unincorporated area. After further growth it was made an incorporated town in 1920.

Expansion

The town's population increased slowly; up until 1940 it was about 600. The creation of Hill Air Force Base to the north in 1940, followed shortly by the outbreak of World War II, changed the face of Layton forever. The population exploded as war workers streamed into the area; the 1950 census counted 3456 people. Layton became a city, transformed from a farming town to a residential community. Growth slowed after the war, but Layton continued to develop as a suburban bedroom community, those not employed at the Air Force base commuting to the Salt Lake City or Ogden areas. The city continued to expand geographically, annexing surrounding parcels of land, including the adjacent town of Laytona and city of East Layton. In 1985, Layton passed Bountiful to become the most populous city in Davis County.

 

Taylorsville is a city in Salt Lake County, Utah, United States. It is part of the Salt Lake City, Utah Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 58,657 at the 2010 census. Taylorsville was incorporated from the Taylorsville-Bennion CDP and portions of the Kearns CDP on April 24, 1996. The city is located adjacent to interstate 215 and Bangerter Highway. It is centrally located in the middle of the Salt Lake Valley.

The area called Taylorsville today is made up of three historic communities in the central part of Salt Lake County: Taylorsville, Bennion, and Kearns. These communities incorporated through a vote of the people with over 70 percent approval in September 1995. The city officially became the City of Taylorsville during the centennial anniversary of Utah's statehood in 1996.

The land on which Taylorsville is located is part of an interconnected alluvial plain that was formed by the wearing down of the Wasatch and Oquirrh Mountains to the east and west. Beneath the surface Taylorsville sits on more than a kilometer of unconsolidated rock, sand, and clay. The inactive Taylorsville Fault has been traced down the center of the Salt Lake Valley. Lake Bonneville shaped the topography of the area and deposited lake bottom clay and sand. As Lake Bonneville dried up over the past 14,000 years, the salt from the breakdown of rock remains, making the soil alkaline. Like most desert soils, it has little organic material and is hard to work.

A broad, east-west running ridge called "Bennion Hill" rises perhaps a hundred and fifty feet above the surrounding area. Bennion Hill is the eastern end of a wide ridge which rises toward Farnsworth Peak in the Oquirrh Mountains to the west.

The first (unnamed) people in the region appeared during or after the last ice age on the shores of what remained of Lake Bonneville. Less than five miles (8 km) from Taylorsville evidence of people killing and eating a mammoth have been found. Some of this region’s first named visitors were Fremont people who used the area to hunt and gather food along the Jordan River more than a thousand years ago. A large Fremont settlement on City Creek used the land where Taylorsville is located as hunting and foraging especially along the river. In more recent times Ute bands passed through the valley between the marshes of the Great Salt Lake and Utah Valley. Most of the area was dry sagebrush-covered land without any natural water sources except the Jordan River. A well-used Ute trail wound along the west side of the river at approximately 1300 West which the Ute used in spring and fall. Early settlers observed small encampments of Ute in the cottonwoods along the Jordan River. At least one local settler called these people the "Yo-No'". Whether the name is his own creation or an approximation of something they said is unknown.

There are poorly documented suggestions that Spanish missionaries, soldiers, and explorers came through the area beginning in the mid-1600s. The whole region was called "Teguayo" and "Lake Copalla" (Utah Lake) appear on maps of Spanish Nuevo Mexico. Spanish and then Mexican land claims remained until the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo which ended the Mexican War in 1853 and ceded the whole of northern Mexico to the United States including a few thousand Mormon settlers who had taken up residence in July 1847.

Mormon settlement

The first Mormon pioneer settlers, Joseph and Susanna Harker from England built a log cabin on the west side of the Jordan River in November 1848 on what was called then “the Church Farm” near 3300 South. In 1849 Samuel and John Bennion and several other families moved south crossing the river on the ice in January. There was little in the way of building materials, so the families dug into the bluffs of the Jordan River for shelter. The tiny settlement, the first "over Jordan," was called Harker’s Settlement, and they began the difficult work of digging ditches to move water out of the Jordan River and onto the land on the west side. The soil was hard to work and they kept looking for better land to farm. The infamous crickets destroyed much of that year’s crop and so the group moved farther south to where Big Cottonwood Creek flowed into the Jordan River about 4800 South known then as Field’s Bottom.

By working together, eight families managed to bring in the first successful crop in 1851 using water brought down from Bingham Creek by what was later called Gardner’s Millrace. John and Esther Bennion’s daughter, Rachael, was the first pioneer child to be born in Field’s Bottom. Despite the struggle to get food and shelter in those early days, John Bennion described Field’s Bottom in these words:

if peace dwells upon this earth it is here and here are the happiest and most prosperous people in the world, enjoying free soil, pure air, liberty to worship our God just as we please…

By 1851 more families settled in or near Field’s Bottom where they dug the "lower ditch" and cleared land for small farms and pastures. In January 1852 Harker’s Settlement was organized as a part of the West Jordan LDS Ward that included the Salt Lake Valley west of the Jordan River. Some families returned to cabins they had built earlier and dismantled them and brought the logs across the river and reassembled the cabins.

In the 1853 the continued threat of attack by angry Utes, locally called the "Walker War" or the "Utah Valley War", forced the settlers to build an 2-acre (8,100 m2) adobe fort called the English Fort just north of the North Jordan Burying Ground in 1854. Stories about "Indian depredations" in Utah and Sanpete Counties and the massacre of John W. Gunnison and his surveying party caused such fear that Salt Lake City fortified itself. Two livestock herders were killed in Cedar Valley, just over "South Mountain" and the Ute attacked cattle herds in Tooele County just over the Oquirrh Mountains. Isolated settlements either built forts or were abandoned. Locals nicknamed the fort in North Jordan, "Fort Hardscrabble," because it was built on what they considered a useless piece of ground. About 30 families moved into or near the fort for protection for the winter, but as the threat of attack faded, families spread out once again and part of the fort was converted into an LDS meeting house which also served as the school.

Hickman Fort, farther south in Bennion, was built by William Hickman. It was located about 5800 South on the bluff above the west side of river. Between 1853 and 1857 Gardner’s Millrace was extended north to the Bennion area and called the North Jordan Canal, the first important canal on the west side of the Jordan River.

 

"

s sugar beets became big business and many farmers started to clear additional land to grow them. The beets were hauled to the West Jordan cutting station until 1916 when the West Jordan Factory was completed. Taylorsville and Bennion remained very small farming towns.

The 1890s saw increased growth and the establishment of a small business district at the intersection of Redwood Road and 4800 South. The largest store was Company which was later called the TMercantile Company. In 1894 the Meetinghouse was built to house the Taylorsville Ward of the LDS church.

In 1905 Bennion was made a separate ward from Taylorsville. Prior to this point is was often referred to as South Taylorsville.

Twentieth Century

The territorial legislature passed Utah’s first Compulsory Education Law in 1890 which gradually brought most children off the farms and into the classroom. It had little effect until the early 1900s when small local school districts, seen as a road block to raising the standard of Utah education, were consolidated. In December 1904 the Salt Lake County Commission voted to combine 22 of the 36 local school districts into the Granite School District with boundaries that matched the LDS Granite Stake boundaries. Schools which up to that time were often numbered were given names.

In 1905 600 people lived in Bennion, enough to split from the Taylorsville LDS Ward and create the Bennion Ward to the south. Meetings were held in the red brick schoolhouse for a time until the Bennion meetinghouse was built in 1907 at the corner of 6200 South and Redwood Road next to the school.

The need for a ‘modern’ school and the establishment of compulsory tax-supported public schools throughout Utah gave rise to the old Plymouth Elementary School on Redwood Road and 4800 South. By 1907 there were so many children in the Bennion school that the upper grades were sent to the two-story red brick Plymouth School in Taylorsville. In 1909 an amusement hall and classrooms were added to the Taylorsville Chapel. Electricity came to the Taylorsville area during the early 1900s but had little effect on the life of most people who saw little use for it outside lighting their homes. It was considered a luxury and many families chose not to connect to the “new-fangled” wires until the 1920s or 1930s when rural electrification made power available to everyone.

Two railroads were important to Taylorsville, the Rio Grande and Western to Bingham Junction (Midvale) and the Bingham-Garfield Railroad was added through the area in 1910. A well was dug at 4700 South and 5400 West where a locomotive watering station was built. In 1913 the electric Salt Lake Inter-Urban, often call the “Orem Line,” was built to make it possible to ride into Salt Lake or as far as Payson on the “Red Arrow” in from the Francklyn Station in Murray or at the Bennion Station. The line ran parallel to Redwood Road about 1800 West. In 1915 the first water system was built by private subscription. People who wanted clean water piped to their homes paid to have it delivered to them. Later this system was bought and expanded by the Taylorsville-Bennion Improvement District. Electricity came to the area in 1916 along Redwood Road. During World War I four young men from Taylorsville lost their lives and sixteen served in the armed forces.

By the 1920s two canals were built to carry water to farms farther and farther west. Redwood Road was finally rebuilt using concrete making it faster and easier to travel for the mixture of automobiles, wagons and horses that used it. How Redwood Road got its name has been the subject of much debate but, when there are no redwoods in the valley, the following explanation rings truest. A line parallel to the base meridian was surveyed on the west side of the Jordan River for use in measuring property lines. Redwood stakes which did not decay in the ground were used for the "Redwood Line". It remained the Redwood Line until 1895 when Redwood Road was built as a main thoroughfare for the west side of Salt Lake County. In 1927 the "Pole Line Road" 2700 West was constructed.

World War II

In World War II, 75 men from Taylorsville served and two lost their lives overseas. After the attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, the US Army Air Corps wanted an isolated place to build a training base safe from any attacks by the Japanese and on the main rail routes to the Pacific Coast. The War Department bought 5,000 acres (20 km2) of dry farmland in the western part of Salt Lake Valley. The land originally was part of a federal land grant to the state of Utah to be used to benefit schools and universities in Utah. But it had long since passed into private hands and was used for dry farms. Camp Kearns went through renamings as the focus and mission of the base changed; Camp Kearn was the name which stuck. It opened in 1942, but took about a year to gain its final size. The base was named for Senator Thomas Kearns of Utah who had made his fortune in the silver mines at Park City.

Just a year later, Camp Kearns had 40,000 residents and was Utah’s third largest city at the time. It had two main missions. It served as a basic training facility for replacement troops headed for the war against Japan. Camp Kearns included a 600-target practice range, the largest in the US, a difficult, mile-long obstacle course, a grenade practice ground, and barracks for thousands of men on their way to the Pacific coast. The motor pool hired more than 80 local women just to drive trucks; in all about 1200 civilians worked at the base as any given time. Camp Kearns had the largest hospital in Utah at the time which spread into ten buildings. A camp newspaper called the Valley View News provided information and entertainment to the troops stationed there.

The base had a water system and one of two water treatment plants in the state. The streets were laid out in a huge grid pattern lined with over 900 wooden buildings covered with tar paper. A railroad spur from the Denver and Rio Grande was built to transport equipment and personnel to the base. By August 21, 1942, the Kearns had 1,700,000 square feet (160,000 m2) of warehouse space, two all-purpose theaters, gyms, two fire houses, several dusty parade grounds, a post office, a lending library, and a bank. Thousands of trees and shrubs were planted to keep the dust down.

The second mission of Camp Kearns was a practice air force base for Army Air Corps ground crews. In time, technical training of air force ground crews became Camp Kearns's main objective. This included many kinds of schools: navigation, intelligence, radio, teleprinter, clerical and many others. It was not an air force base with airplanes landing and taking off, ground crews were trained on planes scattered around the base.

The base had five chapels, three stores, and three theaters, one of them for African-American servicemen. It still exists as part of Kearns Junior High School. The USO brought many entertainers to the base to keep the troops from getting homesick. The Band Wagon Committee raised more than $15,000,000 in war bonds from the communities around Salt Lake and from the men and women in uniform.

The base was dusty, hot in summer and cold in winter. Men who trained there thought it was an awful place to live.[] They stayed in the long tar-paper-covered wooden sheds heated with pot-bellied stoves and lighted with a few light bulbs. Each barrack was home to sixty men sleeping in squeaky metal beds with thin mattresses and not enough blankets in the winter and poor ventilation in the summer.

Most of the men who trained at Camp Kearns stayed only a few weeks and were glad to roll away from it on a train to California.[] Despite the boost to the local economy, Salt Lake and the surrounding communities did not appreciate the huge military presence and tried to limit soldiers to the area around the base.[] African-American soldiers were segregated both on and off base.

As the war drew to a close, the base began a rapid decline. Vice-President Truman made an inspection visit in August 1944. The training functions were moved to California. Camp Kearns was closed as an active base in 1946, and the buildings and materials auctioned off in 1948. Some of the first homes in Kearns were built from materials left over from the buildings of the base. Oner of the chapels survived to be incorporated in Our Lady of Perpetual Sorrows Catholic Church.[]

Camp Kearns gave an indirect boost to Taylorsville in that a huge water pipe brought water from the east side of Salt Lake to the camp. Once Camp Kearns closed, the presence of clean drinking water and a sewer treatment plant made it possible for people to move to Kearns and live in some of the first large subdivisions built in western Salt Lake County in the 1950s.

Taylorsville and Bennion joined to form their own water and sewer district to provide clean water. The large water tank on the hill at 3200 west and 6200 South and the other ones buried inside the hill are a part of the work to provide the clean water. Salt Lake County’s rapidly growing population began expanding west in the early 1970s and farmers found they could sell their land to developers for a lot more than they were making on the farms.[]Subdivisions began springing up.

Incorporation

In the 1980s the intersection at Redwood Road 5400 South began to be developed into a regional retail center with Harmons, Grand Central, Wal-mart and the Family Center. Taylorsville, Bennion, and Kearns continued rapid growth into the early 1990s. Some people felt that the Salt Lake County Commission, which governed the area, was allowing too much growth too fast, especially apartment complexes. The county seemed unwilling to listen to residents which resulted in the first drive to incorporate Taylorsville City. It failed by a narrow margin.

In 1995 voters approved the creation of a new city due to the rising costs of county services, a feeling that the county was not giving residents their money’s worth revolving around insufficient law enforcement, a lack of input in how Taylorsville and Bennion were developing, and the seemingly unlimited apartment developments.

Many of Kearns residents were upset when Taylorsville’s proposed boundary extended its western border all the way to 4000 West which was considered by residents in that area to be part of Kearns. But residents there approved Taylorsville’s incorporation by a significant margin, (as they were given large tax breaks) and that is where the border remains. However Kearns may regain the area if the bid by the Kearns to incorporate is ratified. Since Utah's current township law currently expires in 2010. If the law is not extended, it would either have to become part of the county, incorporate as its own city, or incorporate into a nearby town. Most of Kearns residents, if only given the choice to incorporate into other cities, would choose to become a part of Taylorsville.

After incorporation there was lively discussion about what the new city should be called. Midvalley City, Oquirrh City, Centennial, and Taylorsville-Bennion were all discussed. Eventually Taylorsville was chosen. Taylorsville’s nickname is “Utah’s Centennial City” because it officially came into existence one hundred years after Utah became a state.

 

South Jordan is a city in the U.S. state of Utah. The city lies in the Salt Lake Valley between the 9,000-foot (2,700 m) peaks of the Oquirrh Mountains and the 12,000-foot (3,700 m) peaks of the Wasatch Mountains and is part of the Salt Lake City metropolitan area. The Jordan River flows through the middle of the valley and the city has a 3.5-mile (5.6 km) section of the Jordan River Parkway that contains fishing ponds, trails, parks and natural habitat. Salt Lake County fair grounds and equestrian park, 67-acre (27 ha) Oquirrh Lake and 27 other parks are located inside the city. As of the 2010 Census, its population was 50,418.

The city was founded 18 miles (29 km) south of Salt Lake City along the banks of the Jordan River in 1859 by Mormon settlers. An agrarian town for most of its history, today it is a rapidly growing bedroom community of Salt Lake City. Kennecott Land, a land development company, has recently begun construction on the master-planned Daybreak Community for the entire western half of South Jordan. Daybreak could potentially double South Jordan's population. South Jordan is the first city in the world with two temples of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Jordan River Utah Temple and Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple). The city has two TRAX light rail stops and one commuter rail stop on FrontRunner.

Pre-European

The first known inhabitants were members of the Desert Archaic Culture who were nomadic hunter-gatherers. From 400 A.D. to around 1350 A.D., the Fremont people settled into villages and farmed corn and squash.[5] Changes in climatic conditions to a cooler, drier period and the movement into the area of ancestors of the Ute, Paiute, and Shoshone, led to the disappearance of the Fremont people.[6] When European settlers arrived, there were no permanent Native American settlements in the Salt Lake Valley, but the area bordered several tribes – the territory of the Northwestern Shoshone to the north,[7] the Timpanogots band of the Utes to the south in Utah Valley,[8] and the Goshutes to the west in Tooele Valley.

The only recorded trapper to lead a party through the area was Étienne Provost, a French Canadian. In October 1824, Provost's party was lured into an Indian camp somewhere along the Jordan River north of Utah Lake. The people responsible for the attack were planning revenge against Provost's party for an earlier unexplained incident involving other trappers. Provost escaped, but his men were caught off-guard and fifteen of them were killed.[10]

Early Mormon settlement

On July 22, 1847, an advanced party of the first Mormon pioneers entered the valley and immediately began to irrigate land and explore the area with a view to establishing new settlements.[11] Alexander Beckstead, a blacksmith from Ontario, Canada, moved his family to the West Jordan area in 1849, and became the first of his trade in the south Salt Lake Valley. He helped dig the first ditch to divert water from the Jordan River, powering Archibald Gardner's flour mill.[12] In 1859, Beckstead became the first settler of South Jordan by moving his family along the Jordan River where they lived in a dugout cut into the west bluffs above the river.[13] The flood plain of the Jordan was level, and could be cleared for farming if a ditch was constructed to divert river water along the base of the west bluff. Beckstead and others created the 2.5-mile (4.0 km) "Beckstead Ditch",[14] parts of which are still in use as of 2010.

In 1863, the South Jordan LDS Branch was organized as a branch of the West Jordan Ward, giving South Jordan its name.[15] The Branch consisted of just nine families. A school was built in 1864 out of adobe and also served as the LDS Meetinghouse for the South Jordan Branch.[16] As South Jordan grew, a new and larger building was constructed in 1873 on the east side of the site of the present-day cemetery. It had an upper and lower entrance with a granite foundation using left-over materials brought from the granite quarry at the mouth of Little Cottonwood Canyon. The upper story was made of over-sized adobe bricks.[16] The main hall had curtains which could be pulled to section off the hall for classes. The meetinghouse also served as the "ward" school when it was held during the fall and winter months. It came to be known as the "Mud Temple", and was in use until 1908.[17]

In 1876, work was completed on the South Jordan Canal which took water out of the Jordan River in Bluffdale and brought it above the river bluffs for the first time.[13] As a result of the new canal, most of the families moved up away from the river onto the "flats" above the river which they could now irrigate. In 1881, the Utah and Salt Lake Canal was completed. It runs parallels to the west side of today's Redwood Road. With the completion of the canal system, greater acreage could be farmed, which led to the area's population increasing.[16]

Twentieth century

In the late 1890s, alfalfa hay was introduced and took the place of tougher native grasses which had been used up to that point for feed for livestock. In good years, alfalfa could produce three crops that were stored for winter. Sugar beets were introduced to South Jordan around 1910. Farmers liked sugar beets because they could be sold for cash at the Utah-Idaho Sugar Company factory in West Jordan.[18] Sugar beet farming became so integral to the region, that the region's high school (Jordan High School) mascot was named the "beetdigger".

A big celebration was held on January 14, 1914, to commemorate the arrival of electrical power, the addition of a water tank and supply system for indoor pumping and a new park for South Jordan.[19] By the 1930s, the area needed a water tank to store water for residents living further west. The only way to get a federal grant was to incorporate and become a city.[20] Citizens voted to incorporate on November 8, 1935, and immediately issued bonds to obtain money for the water tank. The city was initially governed by a Town Board with responsibilities over parks, water and the cemetery. In 1978, the city moved to a mayor-council form of government and assumed local supervision of police, fire, road and building inspections from Salt Lake County.[21][22]

One of the worst school bus accidents in United States history occurred on December 1, 1938. A bus loaded with 38 students from South Jordan, Riverton, and Bluffdale crossed in front of an oncoming train that was obscured by fog and snow. The bus was broadsided killing the bus driver and 23 students.[23][24] The concern about bus safety from the South Jordan accident led to changes in state and eventually federal law mandating that buses stop and open the doors before proceeding into a railroad crossing.[25] The same railroad crossing was the site of many other crashes in the following years with the last deadly crash occurring on December 31, 1995, when three teens died while crossing the tracks in their car.[26] The crossing was finally closed, but not until crashes occurred in 1997[27] and 2002.[28]

In 1950, Salt Lake County had 489,000 acres (198,000 ha) devoted to farming.[29] But by 1992, due to increasing population, land devoted to farming had decreased to 108,000 acres (44,000 ha).[30] As a result of this urbanization, South Jordan's economy went from agrarian to being a bedroom community of Salt Lake City. Kennecott Land began a development in 2004 called Daybreak, which is a 4,000-acre (1,600 ha) planned community that will contain more than 20,000 homes and includes commercial and retail space.[31] In 1981, the LDS Jordan River Utah Temple was completed. In 2009, the LDS Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple was completed and became the second temple to be built in South Jordan. South Jordan is the first city in the world to have two LDS Temples, Oquirrh Mountain Utah Temple and the Jordan River Utah Temple, the second city being Provo, Utah.[32]

 

Logan is a city in Cache County, Utah. As of the 2010 United States Census the population was 48,174.[4] Logan is the county seat of Cache County, Utah,[5] and the principal city of the Logan, UT-ID Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes Cache County and Franklin County, Idaho. The Logan metropolitan area contained 125,442 people as of the 2010 Census.[6] In 2005 and 2007, Morgan Quitno declared the Logan metropolitan area the safest in the United States.[7]

Logan is the location of the main campus of Utah State University.

The town of Logan was founded in 1859 by Mormon settlers sent by Brigham Young to survey for the site of a fort near the banks of the Logan River.[8] They named their new community Logan for Ephraim Logan, an early fur trapper in the area. Logan was incorporated on 17 January 1866. Work for a Mormon tabernacle and a temple began shortly thereafter, with the Logan Utah Temple being dedicated in 1884, and the Logan Tabernacle in 1891. Brigham Young College was founded here in 1878 (but later closed) and Utah State University – then called the Agricultural College of Utah – was founded in 1888.

Logan's growth reflects settlement and post war booms along with other changes incident to conditions in the west. Logan grew to about 20,000 in the mid-1960s, and by 2010 its population was approaching 50,000. See the population chart below in this article.

Logan has a wide diversity of economic sectors with a focus on education, manufacturing and processing, medical services, agriculture, and retail businesses. is a city in Utah County, Utah, United States. It is named after Lehi, a prophet in the Book of Mormon. The population was 47,407 at the 2010 census,[3] up from 19,028 in 2000. The center of population of Utah is located in Lehi.[4]

Lehi is part of the Provo−Orem Metropolitan Statistical Area.

A group of Mormon pioneers settled the area now known as Lehi in the fall of 1850, at a place called Dry Creek, in the northernmost part of Utah Valley, near the head of Utah Lake. It was renamed Evansville in 1851, after David Evans, a local bishop in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Other historical names include Sulphur Springs and Snow's Springs.[5]

The land was organized into parcels of 40 acres (160,000 m2), and new settlers received a plot of this size until the entire tract was exhausted. There was little water to irrigate the rich soil, so it became necessary to divert a portion of American Fork Creek. Evansville consumed up to one-third of the creek's water as authorized by the Utah Territorial Legislature.

The settlement grew so rapidly that in early 1852, Bishop David Evans petitioned the Utah Territorial Legislature to incorporate the settlement. Lehi City was incorporated by legislative act on February 5, 1852. It was the sixth city incorporated in Utah. The legislature also approved a request to call the new city Lehi, after a Book of Mormon prophet of the same name.

The downtown area has been designated the Lehi Main Street Historic District by the National Park Service, and is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Lehi has been transitioning from an agricultural economy to a technological economy. This first started with the lengthy construction of a DRAM microchip plant by Micron Technology which eventually evolved into a NAND flash memory business called IM Flash Technologies which was founded by both"

 

The United states Trucking Association
states that there are about
205,000 work with truck
companies and
276,000 private service providers trucking
companies certified to
run in the United States that transferred,
according to their most current data of millions
products, materials and
fundamental products .
There are several usual
carriers either going solo or in
groups on our nation
roads carrying these
crucial items to our
stores, factories and shipping ports.

Also freight invoice factoring
firms help
countless of them and offer their
receivables financing services
nationallycounting
including the following states.

: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho State, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming

 

Cultivated land, including isolated farms in river valleys and considerable dry-farming acreage, is limited to a small percentage of the state's total area. Major crops are hay, corn, barley, and wheat, but the bulk of income from agriculture comes from livestock and livestock products, including sheep, cattle, dairying, and an expanding poultry industry. Abundant sunshine provides some compensation for inadequate rainfall, and the climate is generally moderate, allowing for substantial fruit production. The proximity of high-grade iron, coal, and limestone made Provo a steel center. Industrial plants extend from Provo to Brigham City, with the largest concentration in the Salt Lake City area. Utah is now a center for aerospace research and the production of missiles, spacecraft, computer hardware and software, electronic systems, and related items. Other major manufactures are processed foods, machinery, fabricated metals, and petroleum products. For many years high freight rates and the long distances to major markets, together with a Mormon distrust of industrialization, tended to discourage manufacturing. However, the establishment of defense plants and military installations during World War II spurred phenomenal industrial growth. The proximity of high-grade iron, coal, and limestone made Provo a steel center. Industrial plants extend from Provo to Brigham City, with the largest concentration in the Salt Lake City area. Utah is now a center for aerospace research and the production of missiles, spacecraft, computer hardware and software, electronic systems, and related items. Other major manufactures are processed foods, machinery, fabricated metals, and petroleum products. Tourism has become increasingly important to the state's economy. In addition to the five national parks and seven national monuments, ski resorts, particularly in the Wasatch Range, are popular destinations.

 

 

 

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Searching for the right trucking companies to move your freight can be tough, with the large amount of local, regional, and national truck carriers out there. Center helps make freight shipping simple, finding you the safest, reliable trucking companies every time you ship. Trucking companies are licensed and insured to carry freight safely and efficiently across the country, no matter the size or type of freight you need to ship.Plus, with the high volume of freight we move, we will work to get you the best freight rates possible. Simply enter in a few details below and you�ll see instant freight rates from all the top trucking companies in one easy screen

 

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Trucking Companies serving to/from points within the United States,
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To find companies offering specific Trucking Services in the United States, click on the list of services below.

Click below to find Trucking Companies in the United States:

Trucking Companies serving to/from points within the United States,
categorized by services offered. United States Trucking
Companies will be listed under all categories in which they provide specified Trucking Services.
To find companies offering specific Trucking Services in the United States, click on the list of services below.

Searching for the right trucking companies to move your freight can be tough, with the large amount of local, regional, and national truck carriers out there. Center helps make freight shipping simple, finding you the safest, reliable trucking companies every time you ship. Trucking companies are licensed and insured to carry freight safely and efficiently across the country, no matter the size or type of freight you need to ship.Plus, with the high volume of freight we move, we will work to get you the best freight rates possible. Simply enter in a few details below and you�ll see instant freight rates from all the top trucking companies in one easy screen

 

Searching for the right trucking companies to move your freight can be tough, with the large amount of local, regional, and national truck carriers out there. Center helps make freight shipping simple, finding you the safest, reliable trucking companies every time you ship. Trucking companies are licensed and insured to carry freight safely and efficiently across the country, no matter the size or type of freight you need to ship.Plus, with the high volume of freight we move, we will work to get you the best freight rates possible. Simply enter in a few details below and you�ll see instant freight rates from all the top trucking companies in one easy screen

 

Searching for the right trucking companies to move your freight can be tough, with the large amount of local, regional, and national truck carriers out there. Center helps make freight shipping simple, finding you the safest, reliable trucking companies every time you ship. Trucking companies are licensed and insured to carry freight safely and efficiently across the country, no matter the size or type of freight you need to ship.Plus, with the high volume of freight we move, we will work to get you the best freight rates possible. Simply enter in a few details below and you�ll see instant freight rates from all the top trucking companies in one easy screen

 

 

"

Hayes Truck and Haul has been in business since the mid 1980s. For more than twenty years they've been delivering goods for most major industries in the nation, with business booming as they traversed the country, in all kinds of weather, for all kinds of clients. During the boom times from 2002 to 2007 Hayes Truck & Haul was the mastermind of a top-rated accounts receivable in the trucking industry. Few customers were ever late on bills and those clients who were, were sure to turn in their late payments within a reasonable amount of time. Times were great for everyone, and the cash was flowing.It was just one year later, in 2008, when the economy in the United States took a sharp decline, and both large and small businesses started to notice the squeeze on their pocketbooks: everyone had suddenly gone silent. Business slowed to a crawl

 

. And worse yet, Hayes had noticed during the early part of 2008 that though the bulk of their clients were always on time with payments, the few late-bloomers there were, had seemingly started to spread this illness. And as spring turmed to summer and summer into the early days of fall, Antonio Rogers, CEO of Hayes felt a chill go down his spine whenever he would look at the weekly A/R reports. There was a growing list of clients who now owed them back debt.He had already been to the administrators to ask what the actual problem was. Were they doing things different, or wrong, when it came to collecting overdue accounts? When checking his bookkeeper's records this was definitely not the case. He thought perhaps that he was losing clients to a competitor who offered rock-bottom prices with little to no guarantee of quality performance, and that the folks who owed Hayes money had jumped ship and decided to leave him holding the bag.

 

. Perhaps they were unable to pay their debt to him, but were able to meet the costs of a lesser service. But after doing the cursory research for this and talking to friends in the field, he found that alas, no, customers of Hayes hadn't gone elsewhere. They had just gone home.The situation looked dire to Antonio Rogers. He had employees to pay, goods to ship, trucks to maintain and overhead that was almost unbearable when compared against the lack of funds that were coming in. In the evenings he would discuss his concerns with his wife, Robin, and still find no relief from the worry and frustration.

 

""Lin, I have a really bad feeling,"" he'd sadly say to his wife.""What could you do differently?"" she would ask.Antonio would stare off for a moment and then close eyes. He could see the fleet of trucks he had purchased over the years. He could see them traveling, bringing goods to all of his clients. But somewhere, a haze would form over his fleet and the vast number of vehicles would disappear to but a few. What could cause this ultimate death spiral of business?""I know what it is,"" Antonio said. ""I've relied too long on the profits I receive from invoices alone. I've let too many of our customers go too long without paying on their bills."" All Robin could do was hold his hand and look at him tenderly. 'We know it is a difficult economy at the moment - perhaps it will take a while for people to get on top of their bills'.""Antonio knew very well that Robin was only trying to help, but his responsibilities weighed heavily on his shoulders and he knew he had better do something soon to resolve this situation.The following day Antonio walked into his office with a spring in his step, determined to call each and every client who owed money to Hayes Truck & Haul. This wasn't really a very efficient way for a Chief Executive to spend his day, and Antonio knew he should be overseeing all the other sides of the business, such as shipments and deliveries, approaching prospective customers, or working with his sales team. Even though he was doing something to help his company, he knew he had folks on salary to do just this thing. Wasting money, wasting time - even with the best of intentions, Antonio knew that he was in trouble.

 

Poor Antonio spent the whole morning trying in vain to contact his debtors: they promised to call back, dodged his calls, or made small interest-only payments. He was beginning to feel quite despaired when his secretary knocked on his door.

 

""Antonio, can I have a word?"" she queried, standing in the doorway.

 

""Of course Tanya, please come in."" Antonio leaned back in his chair and looked expectantly at Tanyaerely.""Well Antonio, this afternoon I did some research, trying to work out how we are going to get out of this mess."" She opened up a folder she had been carrying and pulled out a small wad of papers, placing them on the desk in front of him.""Have you ever heard of factoring?"" she asked.""It does sound vaguely familiar. What is it?"" he said.She began, ""Well, it is really very simple. So basically, factoring invoices would enable us to get paid on the nose for loads that we haul.""Antonio interrupted ""Immediately?"".""Immediately, yes"" she added, ""In a nutshell, it is pretty easy. We start by having a professional account manager review our figures and help us set up a company profile. Included in the profile would be the investigation of our accounts receivable aging reports, our current customers' credit limits etc.. In addition, factoring will assist in determining our customers' creditworthiness, independent from their credit relationship with our company. It provides a very broad view.""I see,� Antonio said. �And then what?""Well, after their review, and we�re approved for a factoring contract, we can negotiate terms and conditions. There�s a lot of flexibility depending on the business volume and credit histories. This company tells us what the cost will be to purchase factoring for our accounts receivable. The funding commences once we�ve arrived at an agreement.�Leaning forward, Antonio studied the documents very closely.""I do not know, Tanya - it just sounds too good to be true"", Antonio said quietly.""Now, now, I know, I thought the same thing. But really, they have guaranteed us experts that do all the legwork, which would free us up here to focus on our clients in good standing and marketing, all that good stuff. They appear to be very flexible, Antonio,"" she drew a circle around a paragraph on the document before him.""Just how flexible?"" asked Antonio.""They personalize the factoring rates so that the amount they are willing to take on is commensurate with our needs and our client�s debt. It only takes 2 to 4 days for this to be figured out. ""That sounds pretty good, seeing as we tapped ourselves out with bank loans last year to repair the fleet and money sure is tight. We need to keep business rolling as normal and every day we�re going unpaid, we�re closer to facing some serious problems in both the short and long term,"" said Antonio.Antonio took in a long slow breath, then looked at his secretary with something like hope in his eyes.""Exactly�. This could very well be the answer to resolving the problems we are having with these clients who still owe us money.""Antonio took a moment to think about this solution, and agreed with his secretary. The clients who owed them money were long standing friends and professional resources of Hayes. Just because they were experiencing difficulties paying their own bills now, Antonio was very concerned about losing these relationships. Antonio knew that the economy had taken a hit and he knew that it would probably be a long time before things started to look up again. That unknown amount of time, if he handled these debtors incorrectly, could spell disaster for both of them. He did not want to lose business but he also did not want to lose any more money.""Well, let me think about this tonight Tanya, thank you."" Tanya nodded, satisfied with her work, and she left the office feeling quite content in the knowledge that she had helped Antonio keep the shirt on his back, and possibly hers too.Antonio stayed at his desk for a long time, looking over the details they hadn't discussed during their meeting. What other issues could freight factoring help Hayes with? With his pencil gliding down the sheet he noticed that the factoring company could help fray the cost of fuel with fuel discount cards and fuel advances. Antonio was surprised: it said that his company could get up to fifty percent cash advances on load pickups. Antonio was a typical business man: he despised binding contracts that did not allow room to breathe, so he was pleasantly surprised to see that the factoring company did not require a long term contract, that there was no minimum volume required, and that there were no sign-up fees.""Well, I'll have to tell Nicholas about this,"" muttered Antonio to himself.Nicholas is Antonio's son-in-law, and he really admired the ideas behind Hayes, so much so that only two years before he had started his own transportation service business. At that time Antonio knew the struggles Nicholas would face, but he still encouraged him to follow his dream. With the economy the way it was, if an established company such as Hayes was struggling then the little guys, like Nicholas, were going to be in even more trouble.

 

Perhaps the antidote to these problems was in freight factoring, and they were about to find out.A few short months later, after completing the application process, having the legal experts review his credit history, accounts receivable, and statements, finally Antonio was beginning to find his way out of the hole his debtors had created for him.They took on reasonable factoring purchase contracts and stopped spending their precious man hours scrambling to collect debt. They took that time and refocused effort to offering competitive prices in new territories. Antonio recalled those dismal months when he wasn't aware of freight factoring, and he shuddered at those memories. If Antonio hadn't discovered freight factoring at just the right time, his business may not be operating today.

 

"

 

 

 

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The Future of a Trucking Company, and Factoring The phone was ringing on his desk, and Tyrone Frazier just sat there letting it ring. His morning coffee cooled and his cigarette smoked away in the tray: Tyrone is thinking, and pondering the biggest decision he's ever had to make for his trucking business. Frazier Trucking Company had reached a turning point and he now had to make a decision as to whether he should sign up with a factoring company, and indeed if this would be a good or regrettable decision for his business.

 

Tyrone�s father had started as an owner-operator and had grown Frazier Trucking Company into a fifteen trailer fleet over forty years. There had been some hard times when it seemed everything was going to go under and even Tyrone�s mother strapped herself into a cab to make hauls. His father had worked long enough to see the price of hires drop dramatically during the recession and to see the explosion of fuel prices afterwards. But now things were different: the company was in Tyrone's hands and he needed to ensure that this business would be left in great shape for his sons.

 

To move Frazier Trucking Company ahead into the future, he needed a steady cash flow but there was just not enough money to go around. He had employees to pay. They all have families and the usual household bills. Some of the refrigerated trailers were in need of repairs and he felt to stay competitive it was also a good idea to invest in specialized haulers to be ready for the constant requests he was getting for loads of new energy and agriculture equipment. Every time he had to turn down a request, Frazier Trucking looked weak in a very strong market.

 

He knew what his father would have said - 'wait, take your time before adding new technology'. Tyrone allowed himself a good hard chuckle. His father had been against placing GPS units in the cabs. He would say, �Why do you need the voice of some woman to tell you to get off at an exit that has been the same exit that has been there for years?� Also his father had the habit of teasing all the drivers he caught switching into automatic even though driving in automatic was much more efficient though not manly in his father�s eyes. He knew his father's days were long gone and new technology was very important for the business, like having Qualcomm to reduce communication time for bills of lading.

 

Tyrone knew he was right in his forward thinking. How would he take Frazier Trucking to the next level? More importantly, how could he afford it? Business funding was tied up in fuel bills and the mortgage for the garage and office. Thankfully he'd just finished paying off the bank loan for the installation of satellite radio in the trucks.

 

But was factoring the answer? There was a lot he didn�t understand about the process. It sounded a lot like ninth grade algebra which just didn�t feel like it belonged as part of the trucking business. Factoring companies buy your invoices and manage your accounts receivable for a certain percentage of the invoiced amount. In return, the factoring company pays the trucking business straight away, providing immediate cash flow for the business to pay staff, purchase fuel, and do any repairs or maintenance. Without the assistance of factoring, you have to wait for customers to send you the payment which is often 30 days late. In those 30 days, a trucking company can�t pay its bills and employees in invoices.

 

Tyrone had to really consider what his next step was going to be. He had heard of companies charging for same day money transfers, advancing a percentage of the money owed to your business, while the rest is held in a private account if the bill wasn't paid within sixty or more days. Plus it was worse still if the customer didn�t pay up at all because then the factoring company would take it right out of the money supposed to be coming to you! Through the grapevine, he�d also heard about how some companies suddenly slipped you onto a sliding scale of percentages even if you had already signed a lengthy contract for maybe 3% or 7% so there you are with 10% coming as a cost to you out of the freight bill. His colleague, Ronnie, who owned a trucking company in Missouri, was nearly destroyed by a factoring company who charged him the full freight bill on top of the fees for factoring. Well, what was the point of going to a factoring company if there was shady business like that going on?

 

But it turned out to be quite easy. All the factoring companies he researched were open about their business practices and very friendly on the phone when he called. Customer service appeared to understand their company and explained in clear, concise English exactly how it all worked. He was quite happy to sign an exclusive contract. He liked the idea of a long term commitment so he knew he wouldn�t have to bother going back and forth to different companies and wasting time filing more forms. Nobody charged him for credit checks and they offered him a fuel advance on the pick-up of the load. Many companies offered a non-recourse factoring program that suited him just fine. Also he was happy to hear how much he was offered in terms of percentages on the freight bills. It was good money.

 

It was really refreshing dealing with the factoring people. They were more personable than those loan managers at the bank. He was relieved to note that the factoring companies understood the trucking business and discussed business with him like a respected client, not like someone looking for a handout. The factoring companies were not interested in his credit nor the financial problems his father had experienced in the past. Factoring was based on the credit of his customers and on their reliability which worked well for Tyrone because he and his father had built up good strong relationships over decades with their list of clients. He knew immediately that there would not be any problems when they were contacted by the factoring company regarding their invoices. His clients would not have any problems, nor would they think poorly of Frazier Trucking, because the factoring companies handle themselves in such a polite and professional manner, similar to the way his father had managed the business in the past.

 

Tyrone stepped out of his office to let his secretary know to expect the arrival of the factoring contract shortly. There was a new bounce is his step now: he knew instinctively that this new step would raise the future of his company to a new and higher level, and that all the stress from the past could now be put behind him. He suddenly realized that, with this new cash flow, he could actually expand Frazier Trucking Company and who knows, move into Canada, which had always been his dream. He was a happy man again knowing that he had just made a decision which would guarantee the success of his business and his sons would not be inheriting a financial mess.

 

 

 

 

 

Financial Services Factoring

 

Receivable Factoring Company

 

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Trucking Factoring  Articles

"

�So, this is not a loan?� asked Bryan Morris, reclining back into his chair and crossing his legs. The woman sitting across the desk from Bryan smiled at him, shaking her head.�No, not exactly,� she stated.Bryan Morris owned a small trucking company, and his business had recently fallen on difficult times. Certainly the trucking business can be an extremely profitable venture, and for many years it had been that way for Dan. He named his business Woods Trucking, named after Warren and Calvin, his two grandfathers. They had both been hardworking men, and had done a lot to make Bryan the same.Disaster had struck half a year ago, when two trucks in Dan�s fifteen truck fleet went down. One was involved in a very costly accident, and the other simply rolled over, and headed to the trucking graveyard. The financial security of Dan's company relied on his full fleet on fifteen being on the road, and missing two trucks was just devastating . Furthermore, buying a whole new truck and fixing the other simply took more cash than Bryan had on hand.Paying of bills in the trucking industry is always a major cause for concern for businesses.

 

You could go a month or more before bills were completely paid off. This system works okay as long as no problems arise, but if they do, then things can get quite sticky.Bryan was an excellent business man, and he certainly hadn't done anything wrong. Certain events had occurred that he could not possibly have predicted, and now he had to find a way to protect his business and prevent it from ultimate devastation.And that's why he found himself across the desk from this woman. Her name was Leona and she worked for a factoring company. He had accidentally come across her company one night when he was working late, searching the internet to see if there was some solution to his financial dilemma.She sat there now, and explained. �it is really not a loan at all: we actually buy your accounts receivable. we are not giving you finance to be repaid later: we are purchasing something from you, and when you can you can buy it back. That way we�re protected from a complete loss, but you�re protected from the outrageous fees you would find in a loan from the bank.Bryan nodded. It sounded good to him, almost too good.Leona laughed. �You look like you don�t believe me,� she said.�Oh no, I do: it just sounds too good to be true. I actually thought I might end up losing my business.�Leona smiled, agreeing. �Yes, we get a lot of that. Listen, I�d hate to see you lose your company. You work hard, you�ve put everything you can into it. We all need help sometimes. That�s what we�re here for.""Well, I'm very grateful that you came to see me today.""It�s right down the road, usually we do it all online, but I didn�t mind swinging on by today,� said Leona with a smile. �Let�s see what we can do to help you.�And with that they set about making a profile.

 

Bryan filled the form out, with Leona available to help him if he needed it. The profile filled Leona and her company in on Dan�s company, and would help them determine if he was suitable for factoring. Unfortunately, not all companies are. Some were beyond factoring special brand of help, and sometimes things weren�t even dire enough for it. As Bryan completed his form, Leona listened to his story and she felt quite sure he would be the ideal candidate for Factoring.When the form was done Leona took it and slid it into her briefcase. She then stood, reached across the desk and shook Dan�s hand. He stood before they shook as well, and then smiled. They said their goodbyes and Bryan walked her to the door, and then returned to his office.His employees were there, seven who worked in the office, and as he sat behind his desk once more he heard the familiar clack of fingers on keyboards, the electronic whine of the copy machine.He leaned back and closed his eyes. He felt so drained: he had been flailing helplessly for so long, he just knew his business was going to collapse and probably take him with it. But now, after speaking to Leona and learning all about Factoring, he felt such a huge relief, like someone had just lifted a huge weight off his shoulders. He sat back in his chair and ran a hand through his graying but still thick black hair.All those long, sleepless nights. The terrifying panic attacks that occurred regardless of where he was. Already he could feel all the stress start to drain away. He knew it wasn't over yet and that there was still a way to go, but he could just feel everything start to change for him. He was still here; he knew this was the right path for him, and he felt proud that he had taken the appropriate steps to sort out his problems.Bryan couldn�t help but think back to when he had first started the business. He had opened a restaurant at age twenty two when he was fresh out of school. It had been really successful. Home cooking in his hometown, and he had done very well.But he had gotten bored. He wasn't passionate about the food industry. He thought long and hard, and then he decided to sell the restaurant. He took six months off, and during that time he decided to create Woods Trucking. And that's exactly what he did. For the second time in his short life he created a company from the ground up. He had been successful.Then disaster! The two trucks went down and suddenly his success wasn't looking so guaranteed. He was nearing fifty. He didn�t think he had it in him, to save this company. But he couldn�t give up. The idea of cutting his losses, shutting down, laying off his workers, it actually made him sick some nights. He did not want to quit - both for himself and for his staff members.And now it seemed as though he would not have to - all because of Factoring. Bryan opened his eyes, sat forward, turned his computer on. He had things to do. He could be thankful later, for now, it was time to work.

 

"

 

 

 

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Reasons why Truck Agencies Make use of Factoring Firms.

 

As the manager of your own company, you may likely be much more than perceptive already of the difficulty in making certain that cash flow issues do not become a difficulty down the line. After all, the most disappointing thing that can quite possibly come about for your firm is to find yourself involved in a long and difficult circumstance that leaves you forever trying to find the funds you really need on an on-going basis.

 

For pretty much any business in this case, the complication can come for waiting for work to lapse and actually be paid out into your bank account. Statements, checks, and the like could take some time to actually to beprocessed which can easily leave you with temporary capital issues. Fortunately, there are alternatives out there for firms to delve into-- and one of these is factoring companies.

 

Factoring providers will, in trade for your accounts, supply you with the cash now in order that you do not need to stress over the waiting time frame that could make paying off the expenses and obtaining materialsmore troublesome. With this form of setup, invoice factoring can become exceptionally practical for various firms who ought to get out of a money ploy which they have found themselves in.

 

Given that, depending on the size of the task, it can take up to 60 days for a number of companies to get paid then it is very important to take care of your own back and not leave yourself money short to pay the monthly bills. After all, how many businesses have two months cash flow just occupying there to cover all their bills till they earn?

 

This is primarily true of truck agencies. They generally handle tons of invoices which means a considerable quantity of collection time involves business owner themselves. Attempting to get paid off in time can come to be an amazing struggle and this is the key reasons why you use truck factoring agencies who are thrilled to help out truckers primarily.

 

As most of us know, trucking is an exceptionally massive business with lots of companies out there hiring hundreds of vehicle drivers. Unfortunately, several of these drivers wind up in cash troubles considering that they are still expecting work from six weeks ago to actually pay them. When this is the condition for a trucking firm, turning to factoring firms for solutions might be the finest choice left.

 

This indicates that a truck company can pay off the salaries of the workers, keep all the cars filled with gas and continue to surmount, develop and expand without continually waiting for the finances which is taking too long to come in. Trucking Enterprises functioning without a factoring program put in place are leaving themselves at notable risk, as competitions cash out promptly and continue to broaden.

 

There's absolutely almost nothing to be distressed about when it comes to using a Factoring agency-- they are not like a banking company or any individual who is going to leave you with a big stack of financial debt to repay. You give them authentic invoices from work you have already completed , you are just expediting the payment process.

 

In the United States, where truck firms develop, factoring establishments are not considered taking on loan in any capacity. This confidential arrangement then allows both parties to make money and experience a good future-- it gives the factoring company a warranted asset of earnings to include in the list and it supplies the trucking business the needed cash that they sweated to generate.

 

The trucking establishment bestows their accounts to the factoring agency. The trucking factoring business then take the payments from the trucking company's clients. Factoring has been in existence for centuries and has been utilized for long times by a lot of varying industries-- but none much more so than truckers. While you could lose out on a small part of the money, something like 1-3 % depending upon who you deal with, it means that you are obtaining the finances today and can actually start putting the cash to operate.

 

Once and for all, an IOU or an invoice is not actually going to cover expenditures, is it? For trucking firms when the income can be very good one day and gone the next, it is up to the drivers to work sensibly and to ascertain they are leaving themselves with a significant measure of time and money to get through the week till they are paid once more.

 

So the next occasion your trucking establishment is enduring some momentary capital troubles and you are investing an excessive amount of time chasing slowly paying clienteles, why not start off thinking about utilizing a factoring businesses as a means to get your finances and give yourself a more at ease future in the eyes of your trucking team and your bank dividend?

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Traditional Bank Loans

 

Bank loans are an extremely traditional way for a business to get financing. These loans can be a life-saver, but they're not always available to every business. For example, a fairly newly established business simply may not have the assets to readily get a loan from a bank, even if they do, the standard collateral for a business loan is the business itself, which means that if you cannot make your loan payment, you risk losing your entire business. In addition, while you apply for a certain loan amount, that is all the financing you are entitled to. Once the loan is paid off, you can then apply for another loan if the need arises.

 

What Are Trucking Factoring Companies?

 

Trucking Factoring companies do not give loans, and the money you get from the Trucking Factoring company does not put you in debt. The finance you receive from the Trucking Factoring company is determined by money already earned by your business, but not yet received. The Trucking Factoring company purchases your accounts receivable, or part of them, for a certain percentage of their value - this is normally about 80-95%. The amount of finance you can receive will be based on the amount you have earned and the accounts receivable you are prepared to sell. Once you have set up Trucking Factoring account it continues as long as you wish it too and the amount of money available to you even can grow as your business grows, giving you the ready cash you need to meet your own obligations.

 

What Are The Benefits Of A Trucking Factoring Company Versus A Traditional Bank Loan?

 

Not every business can benefit from Trucking Factoring account financing because you have to have a business with accounts receivable, however there are many benefits for those who can access this type of finance.

 

1. You will not Incur Debt. You do not incur debt as you do with a bank loan because the Trucking Factoring company actually purchases your accounts receivable. One of the main benefits of this kind of financing is that your business credit rating and your personal credit rating will not be affected. Should the unforeseeable happen and your business fails, you will not have to worry about anyone coming after your personal as well as your business assets to pay off a loan. With a bank loan, the debt goes onto your credit report, and even one late payment can adversely affect your businesses credit, and even the ability to get insurance and may even reflect upon your personal credit rating.

 

2. There's no collateral required. Another great benefit of using the services of a Trucking Factoring company instead of a bank loan is that there is no collateral required for the Trucking Factoring company, because the Trucking Factoring company is buying your accounts receivables. In addition, while the Trucking Factoring company does run a credit check on your customers whose accounts receivables are offered for financing, the state of your credit is not an issue. This means that it is easier for new businesses to access the finance they need through a Trucking Factoring company, providing their accounts receivable are in good order. A bank may believe you haven't been in business long enough to be able to cover this risk.

 

3. You'll receive the money faster. With a Trucking Factoring company you can actually get the money you need faster. The money will normally be in your account within 24 hours, once the Trucking Factoring company is confident that your customers� accounts are likely to be paid. Borrowing from a bank begins with vast amounts of paperwork, the loan must be underwritten, and this can take ages before you're notified if the loan has been approved.

 

4.You receive interest up-front. With a bank loan interest continues to build, and this has to be paid the whole time you have a business loan; however with a Trucking Factoring company there is no interest - they take it right off the top by deducting it from the total amount of receivable accounts. So not only are you relieved of those monthly loan payments, but you also do not have to worry about the building up of interest, as every penny in the account is yours to spend on the business.

 

As you can see, there are several benefits that makes considering financing through a Trucking Factoring company over a traditional bank worthwhile. However, there are also a couple of other benefits that a factory company can offer your business is far beyond the scope of the bank. The most important benefits is that once you sell your accounts receivable to the factory company, you do not have to take time away from running your business to collect the money owed from reluctant to pay customers. Since these accounts belong to the Trucking Factoring company, this is now their job. Trucking Factoring companies are very efficient at debt collecting, and this frees up your valuable time to devote to running your company.

 

Another bonus is that, because the Trucking Factoring company has evaluated the quality of your customers' credit before buying the accounts receivable, you learn valuable information regarding your customers, like which ones are likely to pay, and which ones are less likely to pay.While a Trucking Factoring company is not the only way for your business to obtain the money it needs to keep growing, it does offer a type of financing well worth considering.

 

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